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Key Drupal Taxonomy: Part 1

When it comes to considering what is the best CMS for a website, most don’t know up from down or Drupal from WordPress. At Mobomo, we consider ourselves Drupal experts and have guided many of our clients through a Drupal migration. Drupal is a content management system that is at the core of many websites.  Drupal defines itself as “an open source platform for building amazing digital experiences.” These simple definitions make it sound easy, but it can in fact be very confusing. Listed below are some popular terms defined to help make the start of the migration process what it should be, simple and easy:

  1. Taxonomy – classification system.  In WordPress, this system is very similar to the Categories you’ll find in that CMS.
  2. Vocabularies – a category, or a collection of terms.
  3. Terms – items that go inside a vocabulary.
  4. Tags – generic way to start classifying your content (this is the default).
  5. Menus refers both to the clickable navigational elements on a page, and to Drupal’s internal system for handling requests. When a request is sent to Drupal, the menu system uses the provided URL to determine what functions to call.  
    • There are 4 types:
      • Main
      • Management
      • Navigation
      • User
  6. Theme – look and feel of a site, determined by a combined collection of template files, configuration files and asset files (JavaScript, CSS, images, fonts). A theme contains elements such as the header, icons, block layout, etc. Drupal modules define themeable functions which can be overridden by the theme file. There are additional themes available in the themes section of downloads.
  7. Content TypeEvery node belongs to a single “node type” or “content type”, which defines various default settings for nodes of that type, such as whether the node is published automatically and whether comments are permitted. Common “Content Types” that just about any website would have include: blog post and page. Content types can have different fields and modules can define their own content types. The core Drupal Book and Poll modules are two examples of modules that define content types
  8. Fields Elements of data that can be attached to a node or other Drupal entities. Fields commonly contain text, image, or terms.
  9. Node – A piece of content in Drupal, typically corresponding to a single page on the site, that has a title, an optional body, and perhaps additional fields. Every node also belongs to a particular content type, and can additionally be classified using the taxonomy system. Examples of nodes are polls, stories, book pages and images.
  10. Views – module that lets gives you a click and configure interface for running database queries. It can output the results in a variety of formats.
  11. Views Display – created inside of a view to display the objects fetched by the view in different manners.
  12. Module – Code that extends Drupal features and functionality (but doesn’t provide the HTML markup or styling of a theme). Drupal core comes with required (pre-installed) modules and some which are optional. Thousands of non-core or “contrib” modules are listed in the project directory.
    • Core- features that are available within Drupal by default
    • Custom- modules that are developed for a specific purpose that are not available within Drupal Core
    • Contributed- after custom modules are created by Drupal developer, they are often made available to others within the Drupal community. There are more than 40,000 modules available today.
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